Photographer Daniel Sandberg focuses on capturing how human involvement interferes with landscapes and the environment. He often does so in a non-obtrusive way, his work quite appealing to the eye. The observer must think twice to grasp the underlying meaning behind a particular image. Our human impact on nature becomes less dramatic; it is far from Greenpeace but our presence becomes dominant once you get behind the immediate focus of his work.
For more info, see www.danielsandberg.com

The Stockholm based artist Matthias van Arkel uses silicone rubber (yes, the stuff that is also of bodily enhancement fame) to create abstract-expressionist layered sculptures that, according to one observer, evoke “impasto painting.” Sort of like fettuccini art but expressive, different and often times thought provoking. More info on the artist, see http://matthiasvanarkel.com

Torild Stray is a Norwegian born artist who works out of New York. Her work usually depicts universal existential themes, presented in an almost mystical technique. Her paintings of human shapes and forms, whether individuals at rest or groups, seem captured through a mind-shaped fog. As you digest the paintings of Stray it will be clear that here is an artist whose work has something to tell. Take your time; after all, your life experience is your own canvas for interpretations.

Trygve Lie Gallery is located at 317 E 52nd St (between 1 & 2 Aves) Opening reception January 28, 6-8 p.m. For more info, see www.trygveliegallery.com or call (212) 319-0370. More information on activities by American Scandinavian Society: http://www.americanscandinavian.org

UM