Volvo stops for Santa ... And Soon Saves Reindeer, too.

At Volvo we’re building cars that actively scan the area around you, looking out for the unexpected. We invented City Safety - not so much for Santa, who, if he uses city roads at all, it’s only once a year. It’s more to help prevent rear-end collisions at speeds up to 30 mph and has a Pedestrian Detection System that detects pedestrians and brakes the car when necessary.
     The importance of this ground breaking active safety technology is illustrated clearly in U.S. studies indicating that 50 percent of drivers involved in collisions have not tried to avoid the collision.

Volvo’s equipped with Technology Package provide collision avoidance functionalities that include:
• Adaptive Cruise Control with Queue Assist
• Collision warning with Full Auto Brake
• Pedestrian/Cyclist Detect with Full Auto Brake; Distance Alert
• Lane Keeping Aid (Drive-E) or Lane Departure Warning
• Driver Alert Control-Road Sign Information; Active High Beam

For the all-new XC90, Standard City Safety is enhanced
A compact, combined radar and camera unit behind the windscreen is designed to detect vehicles, cyclists and pedestrians, both day and night.
     If City Safety judges that a collision is imminent, it will warn the driver with a heads-up light in the windshield an audible warning sound as well as a short, light, brake pulse; at the same time it prepares the brake system and the safety belts for immediate efficiency. Should the driver not react or react too late, City Safety will brake the car autonomously.
     Yes, at night, for Santa Claus.

     And what about Rudolph? To be introduced soon, Volvo’s Collision Mitigation for animals is the world’s first technology that detects and automatically brakes for animals both in daylight and in the dark.


     Volvo is designed around you and holidays are about you, family and friends. From all of us at Volvo, wishing you a safe and joyous, wonderful Holiday season
God Jul & Gott Nytt år!

PS. Yes, we do know that is a moose. We didn’t have an image of a reindeer, and besides, they’re not native to Göteborg in the south of Sweden.